The Best Interview Question Ever!

The Question:

“Imagine all the people who love and care about you are locked in a room. Their only way out is to agree on the number one thing that, if you changed, would improve your life the most. What would they agree on?”

I wrote this specifically to be able to hold candidates accountable to their responses without degradation of rapport in an interview. It’s recommended it be quoted word for word.

Interpretation of responses:

First and foremost, we’re looking for openness and self-awareness.
The more honest, the better. Here are a few real-world examples:

  • I don’t like authority
  • My temper
  • My diet
  • I can’t say no and run into delivery delays
  • I should quit my job
  • I should socialize more

If the candidate states no one would say they need to improve in anything, they are either not self-aware or have no allies in life. Either is a massive red flag.

If the response is trite, or self-serving, hold the candidate accountable to the question, as in this example:

“So, you’re saying everyone who loves you thinks your life would improve the most if you weren’t so efficient (detail-oriented, friendly, hard-working, whatever)? It’s a difficult question. Take your time to think this through. There’s no rush.”

Whatever the response, it’s merely the X on the map of where to dig, with follow up questions.
OK. Tell me more? Why? What do you mean?
How long have you been working that way?
How have you tried to fix this?
Do you agree with them?
In what way is it impacting you now?
Can you share an example?

Protect your team and your time!

If there’s a mismatch to the job trait requirements and the response, address it directly.“This position requires (insert trait) to be successful. Based on what you shared, is it possible this may not be the right role for you?”

Did you know? 

The person who responded, “My temper,” was placed by me a week later and spent over five successful years in the role. Be openminded and slow to judge until you’ve uncovered the truth. There are no wrong answers, just wrong hiring decisions.

Hopefully, this is a question you can integrate into your screening process to help you better understand your candidates and protect your Salesforce team from a miss-hire. While not every interviewer is comfortable asking personal questions of this nature, gaining comfort will develop over time and through practice, so consider trying it out with some friends and family.

Whether you’re hiring a Salesforce Developer or attempting to find a Salesforce Consultant,

there is one question I recommend above all others. Among my team and for many years, it’s referred to as “The Question,” and it may help you significantly de-risk your hiring decisions.

The question tests self-awareness, honesty/openness, accountability, and stress behavior while giving insight into a candidate’s support network, among other revelations.